Why Class Size Matters Today


HKAA deliberately maintains classrooms under 20 students to help with continued academic and life success.

Related to the increased amount of individual time spent is the quality of relationships teachers are able to build with each student. In smaller classes, teachers better know the strengths, weaknesses, and needs of each pupil. With this increased level of attention, teachers can more successfully relate and instruct, thus becoming more than a simple instructor, but a genuine role model.


Teachers become more than a simple instructor, but a genuine role model

Student-Teacher Ratio

Most Seventh-day Adventist schools have a low student-teacher ratio. This allows for more individualised attention and instruction.

“The benefits of smaller classes extend beyond test scores and student engagement. In addition to the longer-term positive attributes of small class sizes in the early grades, benefits include continued academic and life success.”


Amongst student-teacher ratio there are other reasons where Adventist Education shines. You can read more information here:


https://adventisteducation.org/10r.html


In a 30-student class, it becomes much easier for the quiet kids, or the unmotivated kids, to hide in a clique of friends or the back of the class. With fewer students, the teacher is more capable of ensuring everyone participates and engages the material. This ensures students can’t fake it, thus must keep up, while teachers can prevent declining engagement and scores.



With fewer students, the teacher is more capable of ensuring everyone participates

Study by NCTE


The maintenance of specific student-teacher ratio is deliberate and backed by research made by NCTE.


National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE) an organisation that supports teachers and their students in classrooms, on college campuses, and in online learning environments.


In the research NTCE shows that students in smaller classes perform better in all subjects and on all assessments when compared to their peers in larger classes. In smaller classes students tend to be as much as one to two months ahead in content knowledge, and they score higher on standardised assessments.


The benefits of smaller classes extend beyond test scores and student engagement. In addition to the longer-term positive attributes of small class sizes in the early grades, benefits include continued academic and life success. Researchers have found that reducing class size can influence socioeconomic factors including earning potential, improved citizenship, and decreased crime and welfare dependence.


You can read the full research results here:

https://ncte.org/statement/why-class-size-matters/


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